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consumption on the premise. so the san francisco law is very clear. there is no smoking indoors or outdoors for any type of establishment that serves food or beverages. and mr. ahmed the choice to violate the health code by allowing his patrons to smoke indoors even after our meeting, even after i denied the exemption application, and even the follow-up phone calls that we had in 2010. i also sent a notice to comply. that was in 2011. and then there were two notices of violations that were issued in february and may of this year. so because of the continued repeat violation, the department ordered a cease and desist of smoking inside of the cafe, also insisted the complete removal of all smoking products and smoking devices, and a 30 day suspension for the tobacco permit. now my last meeting with mr. ahmed was june 19, 2012 and he showed me his new product that he wanted to convert to, which is these rocks soaknd jis rin and the glycerin is infused with flavors. i went last night and wanted -- to observe the operations. so it was the same huka pipes being used, the smoking devic
practice. the laws in this area are strict compliance laws, and they are very specific. the federal law since 1990 indicates issues from 1998. all businesses, such as a grocery store, a dentist's office, restaurants, a doctor's office, virtually anything that a member of the public comes into the -- comes into needs to be a barrier-free. we will go over what barriers are. every public accommodation needs to be wheelchair-accessible. there are also other other forf disability. most of the issues we are hearing about are wheelchair accessibility issues. there is a small group of private individuals who are wheelchair-down that go around the city and they look at small businesses. and i dare say anybody in small restaurants have some accessibility issues. it is another attempt at making your building wheelchair accessible. i am not sure which of you may be merchants and which it may be landlords. the law applies to both. and that means you were 100% liable for any barriers to access and any damages that may be associated with those barriers. there are ways you can defend yourself. with yo
identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
. legislation that we have before us strengthens an existing law, to restrict this practice known as hotel evasion. in 1981 the passage of the apartment conversion ordinance, which is second, 41-a of the administrative code made it illegal for residential propertis with four or more units to be occupied pore for less than 30 days. unfortunate le what we have found in recent years there has been a problem that has persisted due to enforcement challenges and a loophole in the law. in recent years we have seen many corporations sidestep this law by signing long-term loiss with property owner ises that their non-san franciscan employees can use the apartment as short-term corporate housing or tourism residential housing. so for example, as an example, in my district, the tenants at the large golden gateway [kph-efpl/] have experienced corporate employees and guests that come in and out of their buildings just like a hotel. based on rent board record there's are an estimate of dozens of these units that are leased by corporate entities. this not only creates quality of life issues for neighbors
you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to dat
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
on together but he proactively came for this bill, s.b. 1506, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that f
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
size would have the same spending obligations as laid out in the law, and he and i have had many conversations where he's made it clear where that was always his understanding, and late 2010, several workers and their advocates came to my office to explain that in their view, employers had found and were exploiting a loophole in the health and security ordinance, a small number of businesses of employers were voiding the majority of their spending requirement by allocating money to what is known as a health reimbursement account. often, using these accounts to severely restrict the types of services that the accounts could be used for often providing no notice of the existence of the accounts to their workers and then reclaiming the majority of money allocated to those accounts at the end of the year. we also discovered that many of these employers were profiting from the law by charging surcharges in the name of employee health care and then pocketing the majority of the money that was collected from consumers in san francisco. so, given that workers were not receiving the healt
corporate tacks. guys, you have been dave is next with forbes on fox. >> health care law back in the headline. the presidential debate and now we are fining out the obama administration is telling states to start adding more people on the medicaid doyle . some of you say that is black mailing state to make the healthcare law look success employ. weome to forbes on fox. we'll have elizabeth john and rick and vict toria and mark and rich. good to see you. emac, is it black mail? >> under the law. you will see half of the uninsured possibly going in through medicaid. the states administer medicaid and the deal with the federal government with the healthcare law, we will match a hundred percent of the cost. that will go down. if you don't do what we like we'll remove the federal fund the states, cops, fire men and teachers and transportation could get cut. >> mark, even supreme court roberts who liked the obama care and said it was not unconstitutional. but a state said who opts out stands to lose a small percentage of the medicaid funding but all of it. he said it is coercive . >
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
by federal law, it's not an easy solution, but the vast majority of san francisco businesses provide insurance and the vast, vast majority of son fra*ns businesses are spending required amounts of money, every survey and report by your agency show that and supervisor campos has acknowledge hated but there is an issue with some categories of business, but we're working together, small business associations, the chamber on educating employers and employees on the rights and obligations under this law. we've worked with television ads on cable television, the city, websites, direct communication with members, thousands of employers have been communicated with by our organizations and by the city to understand how to make this work for the employee and how to make it work financially for the employer because you have to remember in the last half a dozen years, the cost of small business to employ entry level workers in san francisco has gone up 50%. that is health mandate, sick leave, minimum wage, things we believe in, things that as san franciscans we support but things that have a tre
would do something like this. >> cnn legal contributor paul allen said alabama law may well come into play in this case down the road. >> alabama also has virtually the identical stand your ground law that florida has, so do you know that the officer in this case can probably say he was -- he felt that he was in danger of his life and he was standing his ground in shooting. so i'm betting as this proceeds, you may see that law that we've heard so much about in the zimmerman case in florida rear its ugly head in alabama. >> the officer involved in the shooting has been put on administrative leave until the investigation is complete. >>> now to pennsylvania where the state's deputy attorney general and his wife are accused of severely abusing two children they adopted. police arrested douglas and kristin barber after the kids had a doctor's visit. investigators say the doctor noticed several fractures on the 18-month-old girl's head, and the 6-year-old girl's appeared star. they were charged with endangerment. their attorney has not commented. >>> we know the meningitis outbreak ha
the observation of mr. nee. because the sunshine law, 65.24 is far more clear than the public record section as defined in the state law. and i would like to point out that it says in section 67.36 of sunshine that, the ordinance supersedes all other local laws. this is the governing law of official conduct in san francisco. so if i go to the san francisco police department and i want to look at records of a case that is closed. i shouldn't have any problem from the san francisco police department saying no, we can't share any tape recordings with you. or we can't share any evidence that was collected both audio and video with you. where in fact if the case is closed, those are public records. specifically if i want to apply those to commissioner harris. this is important. and i am surprised you looking at me shocked. this is what you get if you spend 10 months on ross mirkarimi railroading him and 10 days trying to push this through. and it doesn't give us an idea of the information and i excuse me me mr. st. croix i was not able to read the documents of this meeting. but i wasn't able to r
enact laura's law and mr. dufty is working on that and finding housing for these individuals but not to keep going back to the economy but one solution is improve the economy so we can improve these people's lives. thank you. >> thank you. >> l the homeless problem it's very, very interesting because you know some cities don't -- i think one of the reasons we do have a problem is because of the wonderful social services that we have here in this city and unfortunately as someone who has sat on several committees it's disheartening that just across the east bay, even if you go to oakland, it changes drastically and i think it's one of the reasons people come to san francisco. do they all live here? absolutely not. and i think we have to get tough with this issue and the housing authority truly needs some restructuring, so that they can do their mandate which is to house people because that's another issue, but there is money missing there, so i think we have to be tough with that and it's like tough love but because we do care and it's going have to be dealt with. thank you
from the law. john: congress killing their funding. so acorn is gone except that they are not on. they just changed shapes. as dan epstein of the taxpayer watchdog group cause of action. what do you mean? >> my organization has been looking at acorn in is reprinted affiliate's of the past year, and we have seen that there are now 1704 groups out there, at least some of which including the mutual housing association of new york here in new york city are getting taxpayer dollars. yet we don't know if they're actually doing anything with that money. john: its new groups. not the same thing. >> the same directors, the same tax i.d. numbers, the same employee edification numbers. in many cases the same employees >> congress cuts them off and they just change names. >> i can tell you that when i were to the house oversight committee as an investigator we went to the inspector general's office, and an auditor told the committee staff when we found direct evidence of acorn housing misusing federal grant money, the auditor said, look, is $10 million. a $10 million grant. when you're deali
dubai which had 110-acre region that had its own legal system that imported british common law "by international financial center which resulted in billions of dollars of capital flowing in and one of the greatest financial centers in the world. john: sharia law. >> except for in the financial center where they realize that by importing bridges, they could actually attract international capital. there is no way they could attract billions of dollars in specifically financial capital in the financial restitutions. so simply very practical and took the best legal system in which to do business, financial business. honduras was going to have the best kind of legal system for creating businesses of all sorts john: you're going to use texas law? >> we are proposing to the perspective under and governor that a default texas legal system without u.s. federal law is pretty good law. most american business people respect and feel comfortable with texas commercial law. many hondurans felt comfortable. separate. the red -- they have to figure out where that is, but it's a good brand globally
including community leader sam ladder. after graduating from u.c. berkeley and hastings law school, bob joined a family firm and became active in numerous civic organizations, particularly within the jewish community as well as on our san francisco human rights commission. he also had a love of politics and successfully ran the mccarthy campaign for the board of supervisors. and i know that he will be missed dearly by the community and his family. my third in memoriam is for gary cray who is known by many in the telegraph hill community, my district, as the filbert steps gardner. gary tended to the gardens of the filbert steps, which is one of our city's great hidden treasures for more than three decades. and he took care of the sprawling garden as a volunteer. it was truly a labor of love for him and he was never paid a dime for t. he worked his hearts -- poured his heart into his work to create a clean, green and serene space that many in my neighborhood and throughout the city have grown to love and appreciate. in addition to caring for gardens, he was also someone who was dedicated
for over 20 years. >> a good attorney and, perhaps as important, very good at the business of law. larry's longtime friend fred atchison. >> he could open 50 files a month in personal injury litigation, which made him a rich man. >> but nobody's perfect, of course. and for all of larry's unquestioned talents, the man carried around with him a raft of corresponding demons. >> i know he had a difficult childhood and that a lot of your personality is shaped when you're a child. >> and, as an adult, larry struggled with alcohol and women. he married and divorced several times. >> it was like a void he was trying to fill, and he never could fill it. >> in fact, from time to time larry had gone on benders and just vanished weeks at a time. and everybody would worry and wonder, and sure enough he'd show up again. >> i had a t-shirt made up once, yellow with black letters, saying "where is larry mcnabney". >> but then finally larry, well into his 40s, seemed to get his act together for real. he set up a new office in las vegas, everything clicked, possibly for an attractive of reason, as tavia d
year, and to just respond to the concern that that data is from before the change of law took effect that places restrictions on the ability to give us the health surcharge when we're not spending the money on health care, etc.. >> i'm matthew cohen. i'm glad to be before the supervisors, for one thing, this is the information we had, and when we saw this information, we found that even though we knew more information was going to come out subsequent to that, this is really indicative of a process which we felt was not something that you can merely look away from even with the amendment that was passed, and for one thing, i am kind of concerned that even though money is supposed to be set aside for workers and if you're using the hra's, if the private employers and a considerable amount of them employ their own accounts, this discourages employees from coming in and basically you're telling their employers what you need the medical expenses for, it's an invasion of privacy, i would rather, it's nothing we saw in the revised legislation that actually standardized guidelines, as far as
are entrusting you with additional funds to you can go out and ensure that these laws we placed on the books are taken care of. >> and just a point on that, my understanding is that a lot of that money will deal with the backlog that olse has -- adding additional resources. >> we have a number of other departments, olse had a lengthier presentation, hopefully we can move more expeditiously in the other departments. so, we'll now move to the department of public health. welcome. >> thank you so much, supervisors, i want to give you a sense of the city option we've been talking about, then go into the department of public health response tos the civil grand jury report, so we used the term healthy san francisco broadly within san francisco, but we're really talking about from the department's perspective in terms of our response, the city option. that is the option that allows an employer to indicate that they would like to contribute dollars to the city and county of san francisco and their employees will get either eligibility for healthy san francisco and enroll in that program or their emp
in his life after he leaves no walking goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about because i want it to lead into what you are unfolding here into this conservatism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right. jackson was i think seen by the end even as a great justice and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trial and it actually taken time off from the court and went to nuremberg as a chief prosecutor in and came back to the court so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was actually in class that would have graduated a semester later but rehnquist finishes working and was so smart he got out early. and so he wanted to -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and his desires and early comments and memoirs and one of the things that was clear was that he really saw himself
, university of texas was doing that, they have a law called the top 10% law which basically requires the school to admit the top 10% of high school students across the state. >> from any high school. >> from any high school across the state. so, this means that diversity on campus has increased enormously and actually is higher at about 25% than it was under racial preferences, at about 21%. and so, they were, they've put racial preferences on top of that. the question is whether this is necessary or appropriate. >> paul: since the gruter decision you had sandra day o'connor replaced by samuel alito and there could be a switch in the decision? >> certainly, and a good thing they are revisiting it, paul, because there's a growing body of evidence that racial preferences, not only don't help the intended beneficiary, which is poorer blacks, usually middle class kids, and might actually be hurting the kids who receive them and i say that, a mismatch of kids in schools. in california when they ended racial references, the black graduation rate increased and that's because more kids were
people and some of the authorities thought they could interpret the law to suit their own purposes. that is why the officials signed the documents. it was not until a few years later that they were audited to see if they had violated their own laws. >> with the director is not mentioning is corruption. officials back then issued permits to relatives and friends and just helped themselves. a former mayor approved these houses and had his own construction company build them. officially, the job was noted down as renovating old fisherman's hut that once stood here. >> i do not envy the homeowners. they are innocent and bought the properties in good faith as the third or fourh owners. now they have got to cope with the ruling of the cour their houses will be torn down. >> the enterprising mayor has long since died and cannot be brought to justice. the other corrupt officials are no longer in office. when a legal structure has already been torn down -- a wealthy latvian build a grand new summer residence for himself on an existing foundation right next door to the former summer home of
of noncompliance of the state law and should be a policy of the commission for that provision. that's one thing. and the other thing i wanted to point out is that the agenda for tonight did not include the minutes. just said that you were going to vote for the minutes. it would be nice if you could put that to the next meeting for those of us who have not seen those have a period to comment. thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioner hur and ethic commissioners. i am troubled that you scheduled my two cases on today's agenda. it's unethical for the ethics commission to even decide a case involving your own executive director. and the whole case should have been transferred to another jurisdiction. not just for developing a recommendation. but for holding any sort of public hearing on the matter. mr. chatfield, when he transferred my case to san jose. noted in the cover mail, quote, the ethic's commission regularly handles cases for the sunshine force act. and however cannot be (inaudible) as executive director is the named respondent in both claims, end quote. it should be argued that the ethic
's actually 6724 that defines what records must be disclosed. the state law into what public information is. >> so i need 6724. >> 6724. >> 6724 actually tells you what -- >> okay. put that on the list for now. that is a fairly important issue though i think. as we define what the public records are, we need to be confident we have that right. >> through the chair an additional point on l. misnumbered l. i will be really brief. >> really brief. >> at the tail end of the sentence it says that a willful violation of sunshine ordinance by elected official or department head occurredment i think you are continuing to drop the key phrase of 6734, that it's elected official department head or city managerial employee. and you should not drop the term, managerial here or throughout the rest of the proposed recommendation. >> okay. referral. means a written document from the task force to the commission initiating an ethics commission complaint. i think that definition can be modified to reflect that the referral is a document from the task force finding a violation of the sunshine ordinance. >> ea
-- berkeley where he attended law school. he was, i'm sad to report, not much of a student, but he was a joiner of fraternities and maker of friends. and it was there at berkeley that he came of age just as california bulldozed its way into a new kind of politics in state history. the political movement that warren was witness to was, importantly from the his perspective, led by a trial lawyer. even as a somewhat shy young boy, warren had dreamed of practicing law in a courtroom, and as a college student he had the opportunity to watch up close one of the most arresting trial lawyers of his generation. hiram johnson, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of cali
law even one that must seem in our short-term interest to do so because of a long-term the goals of those who think international law means anything are those who want to restrain the united states. this is another adviser to gov. romney. i say this not to make a partisan statement, but to say it is different. we spent years and enter the bush years talking about an imperial role for the united states. empire means you have a power about the role. it makes rules for everybody else. that is just not what this world is of central my view. it will never work. i think within a united states that can solve its domestic problems and recapture a sense that it is an example worth emulating, there is -- although they are not nearly as strong as we would like them to be, there is health and strength in the multinational system. >> to talk a lot about continuity. if he set aside the past 50 years, the longest extended continuous strain in the international outlook, staying out of the world. it was looking after our own problems. it is taking advantage of the fact that the atlantic and the p
at this this morning. alabama also has virtually the identical stand your ground law that florida has, so do you know that the officer ms case can probably say he was he felt that he was in danger of his life and he was standing his ground and shooting. i'm betting as this proceeds, you may see that law that we've heard so much about rear itsingly head now in alabama. >> that is really interesting to note. now, cnn, paul, spoke with the victim's mother in this case. she is, understandably, in shock. when things do settle down for her, would she have any legal recourse against the school? >> well, it's hard to say. obviously if her son was heavily intoxicated and was trying to attack a police officer, that's going to be a -- that's going to be a tough case to win. however, these campuses have alcohol problems. virtually every campus in america today has problems with intoxicated kids, and they have to develop policies to deal with it. now, this particular university, by the way, is a dry campus. you're not allowed to drink at this campus, even if you're over 21. i noticed from some local news reports
holmes, i'm sure you're aware he did get his guns and ammunition legally. so what changes do the law -- to the law are you looking for? >> well, i mean i don't know that, for example, requiring universal background checks would have changed what would have happened in aurora specifically, but i mean aurora and columbine, those are the big named shootings that we talk about every day, but kids are dying on the streets in chicago every day and law enforcement had told us that the best way to reduce the number of people who are dying across this country from gun violence is to require background checks. i mean 40% of guns sold in this country don't require a background check under federal law because they're sold privately. i think some people don't know that. >> what do you say to people who suggest that gun control is really irrelevant to mass shootings because the perpetrators will always find a way to get around the laws if they really want to, maybe they'll steal a gun, find a gun, whatever it snies you know, there's always going to be black market or, you know, a secondary market
that although there is a law and we can tell people that, and then you know, there is not very much comfort in that, because then the next thing out of our mouths is, but it's not really monitored, enforced and there are some tools missing that we really need to do proper enforcement. so this is really commonsense measure, i think. it's simply strengthening a law that we already have. it's already been determined that there is a need for it. we have already agreed that it's a problem and that we want to control this and contain this issue. and this will actually give us, again, the tools that we need to ensure that that happens. i have noticed that no one is here from pharmaceutical or the gap or google or wherever the list that janine had. and i think i haven't heard any opposition generally to this and that is because it would be so brazen to show up here today and say, no, we think it's wrong for you to restrict our ability to make a profit at the expense of san francisco renters. who are holding on to their homes in this increasingly unaffordable housing market and that is telling. aga
. another area of policy is patent law. it seems those are two big parts of american policy that don't get discussed. >> well, my brother and i started a business in the mid-'90s in chicago. we eventually filed for two patents. we got them after our business was shut down. >> sad horns. >> we owned so much in legal fees. if anyone came up against us, we couldn't afford to go after them. >> that's the issue not talked about. not only do you not get the patent, you have to defend the patent. >> what does that mean? there's interesting reporting being done on this and hasn't bubbled up. >> i'm a small business owner, i get a patent. you big business are violating my patent. i have to fight you. you have deep pockets, i don't. who is going to win? >> plus the microenterprises that are patent trolls, they sue people for patent information. >> this is in vermont. it's right. i have been talking to business folks there that have patents and they are getting sued constantly. this is an area where government should provide clarity. if you have a patent it should be resolved and settled quickly. you
to residents that are considered by existing law to be displaced temporary or permanently. add the term "comparable to the definition of, "replacement units." this change is accepted and revised in order to mintain consistency with federal law. remove "relocation apeas board," references. this change is accepted in two parts. for the purposes of he relocation plan review, the appeals reference was removed and replaced with "the city funding agency." any project that is funded by a city agency will require that agency to review the relocation plan for compliance with local polices and issue a non-binding advisory statement. all relocation claim appeals will be heard about an administrative law just from the rent stabilization and arbitration board. language was added in order to authorize the board to conduct hearings. and time change public housing development project definition to "hope sf public housing development project." this change was not accepted. it's the goal of the legislation to provide the right to return to all public housing residents that are being displaced. >> thank
is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but definitely, we need to create community anchored solutions. that involves a discourse with policy makers. as people of color, w
, disagree partially. under the previous law, this could be have been a case under the recent amendment ts, this issue was addressed in a var iet of ways including posting and quarterly notice requirements so employees are aware of their benefits and how to use them and by requiring all unused monies to remain with the employee for 24 months, the law now requires that any benefit plan must be structured adds to be reasonably calculated to benefit the employee, olse has the authority to not be designed to benefit the employee and it should not be a qualified..[reading].. the new law that went into effect in january 1, 2012 pertains to that. they are administered by a third party according to to olse's data, 85% of employees use third party administrators or provide the type of benefit that would not be able to provide health information, many employers build in other safeguards that make sure that private health information remains confidential. and then with regards to the fourth response to recommendations around disallowing the use of employee hra options, i would recommend that it state
federal law by endorsing political candidates from the pulpit. those who do so risk losing their churches' tax-exempt status. according to a recent survey by the christian polling organization lifeway, 87% of pastors believe pastors should refrain from making political endorsements. the survey included both evangelical and mainline clergy. >>> the supreme court opened its new term on monday and a majority of the justices -- six of the nine -- attended the annual red mass, held the nday before at st. matthew's cathedral in washington. at the annual event, catholic leaders encourage the justices to draw wisdom from their faith as they make their decisions. the court is set to tackle controversial issu oncagain this term, includina case involving affirmative action at the university of texas. many religious groups are anxious to see if the court will also agree to hear arguments on same-sex marriage. >>> a leading opponent of same-sex marriage, catholic bishop salvatore cordileone, has been elevated to archbishop of san francisco. cordileone was formally installed in a ceremony on thursday.
behind the most of the people being evicted out of the city of san francisco in terms of the laws that they lay, what they're, the arrogance of their position. when you have the residents go before them because they are not being, they are not under the eye of observation. then you really see the bad side of why you need to bring this organization to the light where they could be observed. i think it's a good thing but by the same, we need it done like 25 years ago. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is [inaudible] ladies and gentlemen. the history goes back to 25 years ago to the housing authority and my statement i have been using at your commission for years, ain't no mystery, check your history. ladies and gentlemen, there's deeper history in what we're talking about with the city government channel. i'm the one that started that, i'm not going to get the hand for that because of same things the housing authority tenants went through 20 years ago. ladies and gentlemen, i am happy, tickled not pink by black right now because most of the tenants are a
to the -- for the middle-class families. that is why i passed the connecticut's them sell law, which is saving lives and the people to work. i went to congress to stand for manufacturing and fight outsourcing. that is me. that is my story. it is a very different story from the demands. over and over again, she has shown as she stands up for herself and her profits at the expense of the people that work for her and at the expense of this state. i will stand for only one thing, the middle class of this state. i look forward to the next hour. >> our first question to mr. murphy. >> both of you have had personal financial problems. mr. murphy, you have been sued for nonpayment of mortgage bills. mrs. mcmahon committee filed for bankruptcy and walked away from that. how can connecticut voters felt confident that you will be able to exercise good judgment on the federal budgets -- federal budget decisions facing connecticut taxpayers when you have mismanaged your own personal finances? >> thank you for this question. as i said, i have made mistakes in my own personal finances. but i made those mistakes an
that taking this together that this body of law gives you the authority to order disclosure of records. or that you have the power to order anything that it's limited to record, and more broadly enforcement. let me conclude with a couple other things. >> you it turn it back on. >> the votes of three commissioners are required. what happens when you only have four commissioners present? does that mean that the matter dies? it doesn't address that and has a presumption built in there somewhere. i am not sure if that makes sense. and more importantly in terms of the administrative orders. nothing in here suggested that the commission could make a finding that a violation is willful. and that's to me the most important thing in 3764. if a commission finds that an act is willful, it shall be deemed so. >> i don't think we have gotten there. >> no? >> you are talking about willful violations that are -- you are talking about willful violations based on findings that are made by the task force. okay. >> or made by the commission. in any event, a finding if you look at 64.34, if the commission
and people coming to the united states legally. i think he has to make sure he is enforcing the laws and as you know the big issue for virginians are going to be the defense cuts and i think that is what governor romney is going to sell and i think that is ultimately what is going to help him win the commonwealth of virginia. >> geraldo: what about the latino vote, though, congressman? i underand it that defense is a huge, huge issue in the commonwealth where there is so many defense facilities. but there are substantial number of latinos there, particularly around the disdistrict of columbia. if he talks tough, first of alllet me ask you this. i withdraw that statement. the governor said he will not repeal president obama's temporary dream act measure where he gave a pass, a two year visa to those students you know story who were brought here as children. do you regret that governor romney has done that? >> no, i don't regret that he has. i think your word tough is a little different word. i think if he comes out and talks about the fact as we listen to a lot of voters concerned abo
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